Master, Where Are You

Didn’t know exactly what I wanted to say this week so as I walked into my office, Yoda caught my eye and well, the following Drabble is what resulted. Hope you enjoy it!

My Muse!

As I walked into the room, my eyes immediately began searching, both high and low, as though searching for clues to some dark secret mystery. It was here just yesterday – where could it have gone? Who could have possibly moved it? Why? Everyone has a muse – something/someone that provides inspiration. How else does one find purpose in setting at the desk, pen in hand, or fingers poised above the keyboard ready to share the knowledge accumulated. What were those familiar words once shared with me: “Always pass on what you have learned!”

Master, where are you?

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When the Time Comes!

The Great Beyond!

Here I sit wondering what wonderful words of wisdom I might share with you folks as I try desperately to get back into a schedule of writing a post a week for this site, (as you can see – that isn’t working!). A short time ago I learned of the fact that a blogger I follow has been told that the disease she has been diagnosed with is terminal.

While most of us, on occasion think about dying and deep down inside know that death is life’s only known certainty, being informed that your time is running out causes one to stop and think about and hopefully come to terms with our own mortality.  It isn’t hard to recognize the fact that being given such news is a truly personal and transformative experience. I mean, let’s face it, we all know that we are going to pass on into the big unknown sooner or later but to know that it is going to happen to you and probably sooner than later, that has got to be the ultimate eye-opener about how short our lives here on Earth truly are.

It is one thing to look upon death as “the great equalizer” but how do you handle knowing that your time is soon near?  The older I become, while not often, the thought of death and dying does slip out of my subconscious mind into my everyday thoughts. Not to the point of dwelling on the subject, mind you. But usually when I happen to be in our community clubhouse and I see the Memorial plaque on the wall which lists those individuals who have since passed on. As a matter of fact, just within our small community of 297 homes, last count there were thirteen of my friends who have passed on in 2018. Add to that fact that several of my close relatives have passed both in 2017 and 2018. As we get older and recognize that friends and relatives are passing on – it does make one realize that many of us in our seventies and eighties are truly in the twilight years of our lives.

They say there are five stages of death: denial and isolation, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. The question that haunts me whenever I allow myself to drift off and recognize the fact that we all will inevitably face this fact is: “Will I confront death with both eyes open and grapple with the conundrum of death or will I allow the torment of illness to change my relationship to the world around me. When you get right down to it, I am sure we could all come up with various questions that would pop into our head were we to be given such news. Questions such as: “Now that I know I am facing death, what is there left that makes my life worth living?)” Being told that your future will not be geared to goals you may have set for yourself over the years or plans you have for the future, what do you do?

Receiving such news makes one face his or her own mortality which when you stop and think about it changes nothing in one sense and everything in another sense. It is sort of like wanting to say to yourself: “Okay, I give up, I can’t go on. But then on the other hand, not knowing when the exact moment is going to be, you also ask yourself – what has changed?  You may as well say to yourself: “I can go on.”

Hopefully when my time comes (actually I would like to take the coward’s way out and die peacefully in my sleep but seeing how my sleep habits are anything but peaceful – I am not holding my breath on that being my way to leave this world), I will merely seize every moment granted to me because when one gets right down to it, “time is all we have…. and when we receive that news, the only thing that has changed is that we found out that we don’t have as much time as we thought we had.” 

It gets back to something many of us have been saying for years and that is enjoy life and “live every day as though it may be your last.” If we do that, chances are we may well avoid those five stages of death.

Until next time!

Wake Up Call

As has been the case lately, I have not been writing posts as frequently as I would like to. It would appear a small thing called ‘life’ tends to get in the way. I know ….excuses, excuses, excuses! But, having said that I have another reason for not writing and that is that my “Idea” box is empty. Empty, that is, until around three o’clock this morning.

It was after I woke to go to the bathroom (one of three or four trips that I make in an evening – “Oh, the joys of getting old – but having reached age 78 last month, I am not complaining – just confessing!” During one of these trips I started thinking about what my next post should be about. What entered my head was a combination of things – one, I was feeling sorry for myself because lately I have been having some minor health problems and how this minor health problem could be looked upon as a  disability!

But then, my mind then wandered (which it tends to do a lot lately) to item number two which was about some of the posts I recently read where some retirees complain because they do not know what to do with themselves now that they are retired.

This combination of ideas got me to thinking, not of myself, but of others, people with true disabilities, not the mediocre ones many of us feel we suffer with during our daily lives. I got to thinking how these people managed to hold it all together and have the strength to move forward and do something with their life. Many of which probably never did retire as they were too wrapped up with what they enjoyed doing every day of their lives.

People like: Helen Keller – born June 27, 1880, and became deaf and blind at 19 months yet went on to become involved in significant political, social, and cultural movements of the 20th century and worked diligently until her passing to improve the lives of people with disabilities.

Or, John Nash – an American mathematician, born June 13, 1928, whose life, marked by acute paranoid schizophrenia, is known to us thanks to the film “A Beautiful Mind.”  Knowing of his illness, Nash fought against it and went on to develop a successful academic career that earned him the Nobel Prize in Economics in 1994.

Christy Brown, an Irish writer and painter who had cerebral palsy yet went on to write or type only with the toes of one foot and his most recognized work is his autobiography, titled My Left Foot.

I could go on an on as there are so many – Stephen Hawking, Marlee Beth Matlin, Michael J. Fox, Stevie Wonder, Nick Vujicic, Andrea Boccelli, and Muhammad Ali to name a few.

Many of us handicap ourselves into thinking “woe is me – what am I going to do with myself – I have it so bad” or “what is happening to me ‘sucks’.” When such a thought crosses our mind, what we need to do is “Gibb slap” ourselves on the back of our head and thank our lucky stars we are not ‘disabled’ in the true sense of the word, straighten up, and get on with our lives doing something instead of whining about it – myself included.

Besides, ‘wine’ is best served at the end of the day as we sit back, put our feet up, relax, and take stock of what we accomplished today. After all, we are retired, we have as much time as we need to get it right! Or do we?

Until next time!

What is a Drabble?

 

Over the summer I had two goals as they related to my writing – First was to make it a point to write 200 words a day and save same for possible editing at a later date to incorporate into yet another book I would like to write.

Another goal I had was to begin dabbling in “drabbles.”

A drabble is a short work of fiction of around one hundred words in length. The purpose of the drabble is brevity, testing the author’s ability to express interesting and meaningful ideas in a confined space.

With that thought in mind, I thought I would share one of my drabbles here on this site which will do two things:

Enable me to meet my goal of posting once a week here on my Word Press account while at the same time introducing you all to Drabbles.

Here is one drabble I wrote while on vacation over the summer:

“It is 4:30 am in the morning. Shortly I will be done with my paper route and off on a fishing trip. I climb the steps to the entrance of the apartment building.  I enter the building to drop three papers for the customers that live there. He is just standing there at attention – a soldier in full uniform – he doesn’t say a word – it’s almost as though he is dead. I drop the papers and run the rest of my route. Upon arriving home, I waken my mother and ask her a question – “Mom, have my hair turned white?”

newspaper-boy-1245363

Hope you enjoyed this little piece of nonsense!  Until next time!

What is a Back Burner?

Many people say: “those who think they are doing good by ‘multi-tasking’ are really only doing many jobs or projects at one time – but not necessarily to the best of their ability.”

stove burner

I used to multi-task and to some extent still do more than one thing at a time like glance over something I want to read while also watching a TV show. But when I want to truly occupy my mind, while doing a project around the house, I will allow a different project I am thinking about to mull around in the “back burner” of my mind. The back burner of our minds operates like the stove in our kitchen once the meal is prepared but not quite ready to serve. We move the pot to the back burner to simmer allowing all the ingredients to mix, blend, and simmer creating this wonderful tasty meal for others to enjoy.

Back burners operate like a slow cooker – you toss in various ingredients, mix them up, and then walk away from them for several hours. The less times you open the pot to check on how they are doing – the better the meal will taste once done.

Many times, when I have problems that need solving and aren’t so earth-shattering that they need to be attended to immediately, I toss the idea around in the back of my head – usually subconsciously – allowing the problem to simmer such as the meal in the crockpot. We may not know it, but our back burner is always there ready to help us in situations like this.  While we are scurrying around doing our daily tasks, this back burner – while quieter and softer than our everyday mind – is intelligently thinking of ways to solve the problem(s) we have no immediate answer for.

Taking things to task this way enables our brain to be utilized both while working on current projects and silently thinking about the problems we want to tackle a day, week, or month down the road. It is not meant to be used to procrastinate though. When we toss the problem onto our back burner – it is to obtain – at a later date – a solution to the problem. Not only can this method assist in solving many problems, it should also reduce the stress in  one’s life.